I was a square once. It wasn't boring. I was a rebellious square.

 

lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’

Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014

Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly

Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz

Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis

Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba

Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi

Photograph #10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

I’m pretty sure I’m sitting next to my professor who could probably ruin my semester.
Better act cool

usnatarchives:

We’re continuing our six weeks of style and moving on from the fashion of the Revolutionary War to the men and women of the nineteenth century.
Check out that beard and mustache! According to some historians, the hairy trend can be attributed to the popularization of Victorian ideals. Prominent facial hair was gradually considered to be an outward, physical expression of masculinity. If you want to learn more about this facial hair frenzy during the Civil War era, take a look at today’s Pieces of History post. Image: Gen. George S. Greene, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. National Archives Identifier: 527885.

usnatarchives:

We’re continuing our six weeks of style and moving on from the fashion of the Revolutionary War to the men and women of the nineteenth century.

Check out that beard and mustache! According to some historians, the hairy trend can be attributed to the popularization of Victorian ideals. Prominent facial hair was gradually considered to be an outward, physical expression of masculinity. If you want to learn more about this facial hair frenzy during the Civil War era, take a look at today’s Pieces of History post. Image: Gen. George S. Greene, ca. 1860 - ca. 1865. National Archives Identifier: 527885.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 25, 1921: FDR is Diagnosed with Polio
On this day in 1921, Dr. Robert Lovett diagnosed 39-year-old Franklin Roosevelt with infantile paralysis, more commonly known as polio. The diagnosis came a few weeks after a fall into icy waters that left him unable to feel parts of his body and hold his own weight. 
Although there was no cure for polio at the time, FDR participated in rehabilitation classes and swimming exercises to regain his strength before re-entering politics.
Learn about FDR’s recovery process with this preview clip from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.
Photo: President Roosevelt in his wheelchair on the porch at Top Cottage in Hyde Park, NY with his dog, Fala, and Ruthie Bie, granddaughter of the cottage’s caretaker. February 1941. Wikimedia Commons.

pbsthisdayinhistory:

August 25, 1921: FDR is Diagnosed with Polio

On this day in 1921, Dr. Robert Lovett diagnosed 39-year-old Franklin Roosevelt with infantile paralysis, more commonly known as polio. The diagnosis came a few weeks after a fall into icy waters that left him unable to feel parts of his body and hold his own weight.

Although there was no cure for polio at the time, FDR participated in rehabilitation classes and swimming exercises to regain his strength before re-entering politics.

Learn about FDR’s recovery process with this preview clip from Ken Burns’s The Roosevelts.

Photo: President Roosevelt in his wheelchair on the porch at Top Cottage in Hyde Park, NY with his dog, Fala, and Ruthie Bie, granddaughter of the cottage’s caretaker. February 1941. Wikimedia Commons.

dinosaurstalking:

Language doesn’t exist outside of the minds of the speakers. There is no perfect, abstract English to which we should all aspire.

There is simply my English, and your English, and their English, and the space between them, and the things they share in common.

(Source: miniprof)

http://solongasitswords.tumblr.com/post/66271972857/jumpingjacktrash-roachpatrol-dw-when-did

jumpingjacktrash:

roachpatrol:

dw:

when did we replace the word “said” with “was like”

i think it’s really interesting and cool actually that language has shifted so that ‘said’ implies that you’re quoting, while ‘was like’ means ‘i’m doing a general impression of this dude’. i…

(Source: combusken)

theatlantic:

English Has a New Preposition, Because Internet

Let’s start with the dull stuff, because pragmatism. 
The word “because,” in standard English usage, is a subordinating conjunction, which means that it connects two parts of a sentence in which one (the subordinate) explains the other. In that capacity, “because” has two distinct forms. It can be followed either by a finite clause (I’m reading this because [I saw it on the web]) or by a prepositional phrase (I’m reading this because [of the web]). These two forms are, traditionally, the only ones to which “because” lends itself.
I mention all that … because language. Because evolution. Because there is another way to use “because.” Linguists are calling it the “prepositional-because.” Or the “because-noun.”
You probably know it better, however, as explanation by way of Internet—explanation that maximizes efficiency and irony in equal measure. I’m late because YouTube. You’re reading this because procrastination. As the linguist Stan Carey delightfully sums it up: “‘Because’ has become a preposition, because grammar.” 
Read more. [Image: Skreened.com]

theatlantic:

English Has a New Preposition, Because Internet

Let’s start with the dull stuff, because pragmatism.

The word “because,” in standard English usage, is a subordinating conjunction, which means that it connects two parts of a sentence in which one (the subordinate) explains the other. In that capacity, “because” has two distinct forms. It can be followed either by a finite clause (I’m reading this because [I saw it on the web]) or by a prepositional phrase (I’m reading this because [of the web]). These two forms are, traditionally, the only ones to which “because” lends itself.

I mention all that … because language. Because evolution. Because there is another way to use “because.” Linguists are calling it the “prepositional-because.” Or the “because-noun.

You probably know it better, however, as explanation by way of Internet—explanation that maximizes efficiency and irony in equal measure. I’m late because YouTube. You’re reading this because procrastination. As the linguist Stan Carey delightfully sums it up: “‘Because’ has become a preposition, because grammar.”

Read more. [Image: Skreened.com]

cognitivedissonance:

Tonight in Ferguson, Mo. Even CNN is calling out police brutality.

We are watching history unfold. Do not stand down. Spread the word.

No justice, no peace.